Ethiopia and the United States: History, Diplomacy, and Analysis

By Getachew Metaferia | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 9. ETHIOPIA–US RELATIONS: THE POST MILITARY REGIME
(1991–2008)

With the overthrow of the military regime in 1991 and the end of the Cold War, the Ethio–US relationship was again normalized. A civilian government with guerilla fighting experience replaced the military. The core of the new government is the Tigre People’s Liberation Front (TPLF).

After seventeen years, the military regime of Colonel Mengistu Haile Mariam, despite commanding the largest military power in sub-Sahara Africa (except for South Africa), collapsed in 1991. The rebel forces of the Tigre People’s Liberation Front (TPLF) and Eritrean People’s Liberation Front (EPLF) coordinated their efforts on the military front and skillfully undermined the government from within and without. The military regime also faced an economic crisis and was almost out of hard currency as it presided over a virtual war economy. The rank and file of the military lost its zeal to fight. Morale declined, corruption of the higher military hierarchy escalated, and Mengistu’s regime brutally murdered some of the most capable military leaders after an attempt to overthrow Mengistu in 1989. The situation also emboldened the TPLF and the EPLF. Some members of the army defected and joined forces that fought against the military regime.1

After USSR cut its military support, Mengistu turned to Israel for weapons in exchange for the emigration of Ethiopian Jews (Bete Israel). The Israeli’s nominal support failed to shore up Mengistu’s power. Mengistu’s government was ultimately weakened and subsequently collapsed. Mengistu had been the sole ruler of Ethiopia since 1977, after eliminating all his contenders for power such as Colonel Atnafu Abate, the vice-president, and Generals Teferi Bante and Michael Andom, both of whom served as presidents and were part of the force that overthrew Emperor Haile Selassie in 1974. He secretly fled to Harare, Zimbabwe, on May 21, 1991, as rebels advanced on Addis Ababa. The rebel groups, a month before his departure and before

1 Ruth Iyob and Edmond J. Keller, “The Special Case of the Horn of Africa,” in Donald Rothchild and Edmond J. Keller. 2006. Africa–US Relations: Strategic Encounters, Boulder, Colorado: Lynne Rienner Publishers, pp. 105-106.

-71-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Ethiopia and the United States: History, Diplomacy, and Analysis
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 208

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.