Hearts and Minds: Canadian Romance at the Dawn of the Modern Era, 1900-1930

By Dan Azoulay | Go to book overview

Notes

INTRODUCTION: WHY ROMANCE?

1 10 March 1913, p. 6.

2 Exceptions include Paul and Audrey Grescoe, The Book of Love Letters: Canadian Kinship, Friendship, and Romance (Toronto: McClelland & Stewart, 2005); Charles Fisher, ed., Dearest Émilie: The Love-Letters of Sir Wilfrid Laurier to Madame Emilie Lavergne (Toronto: NC Press, 1989); and my own collection, Only the Lonely: Finding Romance in the Personal Columns of Canada’s Western Home Monthly 1905–1924 (Calgary: Fifth House, 2000). Several good collections of letters between individual soldiers and their homefront sweethearts during World War I have also been published. Perhaps the best is N. Christie, ed., Letters of Agar Adamson 1914 to 1919 (Ottawa: CEF Books, 1997).

3 Ward, Courtship, Love and Marriage in Nineteenth-Century English Canada (Montreal: McGill-Queen’s University Press, 1990).

4 Ward argues, for example, that women’s “courtship territory” – that is, the physical spaces or venues in which they were most likely to meet men – was more circumscribed than for men, but this is illogical, for a courtship space is, by definition, a place where men and women could interact; it would have to have been equal for both sexes. What he probably means to say is that men had more freedom than women to seek out partners and were therefore more likely to find a partner.

5 In his Introduction, Ward states that he draws “heavily on … the diaries and letters written and read by ordinary men and women,” but this is an exaggeration in my view. A few sentences later he concedes that criticisms such as mine “cannot be dismissed out of hand. For one thing, written records come from the literate population and their use inevitably creates a bias toward the higher social strata” and that “even among the literate, the papers of the noteworthy are more likely to survive than those of ordinary folk.” Ward, 5–6.

6 The Importance of Being Monogamous: Marriage and Nation-building in Western Canada to 1915 (Edmonton: University of Alberta Press, 2008).

7 Ibid., especially 6–9, 21–22, 27, 53–54, 78. Less convincing is Carter’s claim that inter-racial marriage was widely proscribed, by medical experts, government officials, and the like. Not only does she provide few examples of this, but her observation that the Territorial government tried to force white men to marry, rather than just live with, native women (to ensure child support in the event of desertion) undermines the argument. Carter, The Importance of Being Monogamous, 68–71.

-237-

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Hearts and Minds: Canadian Romance at the Dawn of the Modern Era, 1900-1930
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowlegments ix
  • Introduction - Why Romance? 1
  • 1 - The Woman of His Dreams 21
  • 2 - The Man of Her Dreams 53
  • 3 - The Dos and Don’Ts of Romance 91
  • 4 - Courtship Hardship 127
  • 5 - Love and War 165
  • Epilogue - The New Order 205
  • Glossary 235
  • Notes 237
  • Index 287
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