American Cinema of the 1930s: Themes and Variations

By Ina Rae Hark | Go to book overview

1937

Movies and New Constructions
of the American Star

ALLEN LARSON

When Franklin Delano Roosevelt delivered his second inaugural address on 20 January, he envisioned himself as the leader of a nation fundamentally transformed by the brutal lessons of economic devastation. As the federal judiciary, conservative legislators, and industry leaders emboldened by the slow tide of economic recovery threatened to unmake the "New Deal" wherever they could, Roosevelt sought to canonize the victories of his administration's first one hundred days as the refurbished philosophical foundations of U.S. society (Inaugural 148–49). "Our progress out of the depression," he told the nation, "is obvious. But that is not all that you and I mean by the new order of things … the greatest change we have witnessed has been the change in the moral climate of America" (Inaugural 149–50). Ostensible recovery still left "one-third of a nation illhoused, ill-clad, ill-nourished," and Roosevelt promised another four years of work "to bring private autocratic powers into their proper subordination to the public's government" and to make manifest a new national moral vision that had undermined "old admiration of worldly success as such" and abandoned "tolerance of the abuse of power by those who betray for profit the elementary decencies of life."

Four months after Roosevelt's address, the horrific bombing of Guernica, Spain's civilian population, memorialized in Pablo Picasso's great painting, would draw the world's attention more intently to the escalating turmoil in Europe. As speculation about the merits and arguable inevitability of U.S. military involvement in the turmoil abroad continued to grow, Amelia Earhart's shocking disappearance in the South Pacific turned a news media sensation designed to celebrate American individualism and technological idealism into a sobering occasion for collective grief, and another drastic economic downturn in autumn further polarized debate about the virtues of Roosevelt's economic policy agenda. The opening of the A&P supermarket chain, featuring on its shelves new products like Spam, Pep

-182-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
American Cinema of the 1930s: Themes and Variations
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 280

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.