History of the United States of America, from the Discovery of the Continent - Vol. 4

By George Bancroft | Go to book overview

CHAPTER II.
NEW JERSEY CLAIMS AN EQUAL REPRESENTATION OF THE
STATES.
THE FIFTEENTH TO THE NINETEENTH OF JUNE 1787.

THE plan of Virginia divested the smaller states of the equality of suifrage, which they had enjoyed from the inception of the union. “See the consequence of pushing things too far,” said Dickinson to Madison; the smaller states, though some of their members, like himself and the delegates from Connecticut, wished for a good national government with two branches of the legislature, were compelled, in self-defence, to fall back upon the articles of confederation.*

The project which in importance stands next to that of Virginia is the series of propositions of Connecticut. It consisted of nine sections, and in the sessions of the convention received the support of every one of the Connecticut delegation, particularly of Sherman and Ellsworth. It was framed while they were still contriving amendments of the articles of the confederation.† It gave to the legislature of the United

* Gilpin, 863, note; Elliot, 191.

Therefore, certainly, before 19 June, and probably soon after the arrival of Sherman in Philadelphia. The Connecticut members were not chosen till Saturday, the twelfth of May. Ellsworth took his seat the twenty-eighth of May, Sherman the thirtieth, and Johnson the second of June. For the plan, see the Life of Roger Sherman by Jeremiah Evarts, in Biography of the Signers, Ed. of 1828, pp. 42–44. It may be that Sherman drew the paper; but one of the articles corresponds with the sixth recommendation of a committee on which Ellsworth served with Randolph in 1781; and is very similar to a proposition made in 1786 by a sub-committee of which Johnson was a member; and another, the sixth, does no more than adopt the report of a committee of which Ellsworth was a member with Hamilton and Madison in 1783. It is hard to say whether Sherman or Ells.

-231-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
History of the United States of America, from the Discovery of the Continent - Vol. 4
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 572

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.