History of the United States of America, from the Discovery of the Continent - Vol. 4

By George Bancroft | Go to book overview

VOLUMES I AND II NOW READY.
A. HISTORY
OF THE
PEOPLE OF THE UNITED STATES,
FROM THE REVOLUTION TO TEE CIVIL WAR.
By JOHN BACH McMASTER.
To be completed in five volumes. Volumes I and II now ready.
Octavo, cloth, gilt top. Price, $2.50 each.

“The second volume of ‘A History of the People of the United States, from the Revolution to the Civil War,’ by John Bach McMaster, well sustains the reputation gained by the author in the preceding installment of the work. The fascinating ow, brilliancy, and animation of the style, the admirable and comprehensive arrangement, the excellent thought and judgment that distinguish the reflective portions of the book, the vast amount of interesting information regarding the social condition of the country in the various stages of its progress, and hitherto unused in any previous history of the country, make the work one of the most important and most valuable stories of our nation’s career that has as yet appeared. It combines the wide scope of Maeaulay in its recourse to the daily newspapers, the broad-, sides, the pamphlets, and the diaries of the eras treated in turn, and the broad aim’ of Green in relating the history of a people instead of its governments. The churches, their ministers and visitors; the theatres, their actors and audiences; the sports and holidays of the people; the influences of political events upon the inner life of the different sections or the country; the courts, newspapers, magazines, books, are all dealt with in that bright, masterly, and attractive manner which the author has brought with such skill and such delightful effect to bear for the first time upon our historical literature. There is not a page in the volume that can not be read with eager interest, and, when the work shall have been completed, there can be but little doubt that it will take its place among our foremost standard classics in its kind.”—Boston Evening Gazette.

“Professor McMaster’s second volume covers the fourteen years from 1790 to 1803, a period not only rich in interest for its own sake, but in many respects unsurpassed in importance by any other portion of American history of similar length. Such a period js a crucial test for the historian. The two volumes are already a history sui generis, which has made and will keep its own place in our literature.”— New York Evening Post.

“The second volume of ‘A History of the People of the United States,’ by John Bach McMaster (Appletons), satisfies the high expectations raised by its predecessor. Although the period depicted offers many temptations for divergence, he has refrained from departing from the carefully defined limits of his original plan, and has never suffered himself to forget that he is aiming, not at a political discussion, but at a social study; at a history, noi of government and legislation, but of the community at large, the thoughts, feelings, works, and ways of the plain people who made up a century ago, as they do now, a vast majority of the American citizens. No reader will fail to be impressed by the huge mass of materials in the diverse forms of pamphlets, contemporary newspapers, and published or unpublished letters which has been ransacked, winnowed, weighed, and condensed by the indefatigable weaver of this narrative. There are in this volume more than 630 larşe 8vo pages, yet we could not spare one, for every one is crammed with facts, which, when not new themselves, contribute by their collocation to a new and vivia picture.”—New York Sun.

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