Accelerating Democracy: Transforming Governance through Technology

By John O. McGinnis | Go to book overview

CHAPTER SEVEN
Regulation in an Age of Technological Acceleration

MODERN GOVERNMENT is largely administrative government. Congress, by legislation, delegates substantial power to executive agencies. These agencies then promulgate regulations on a wide variety of subjects, from pollution to banking, from consumer safety to pharmaceuticals. While Congress oversees and influences the content of these regulations by conducting hearings on agency performance, it rarely overturns them. Courts also defer to the decisions of agencies and overturn only those regulations that are outside the scope of Congress’s delegation or are not supported by evidence.

Administrative government though agency regulation was itself a response to technological change. The rise of the administrative state in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries coincided with the faster change brought about by industrialization.1 Legislators were thought to have inadequate sources of information to use in formulating responses to such change. Indeed, some architects of the new legal and political order were aware that technological change was a cause of the administrative state’s necessity.2

The rise of the administrative state can thus be understood in terms of restructuring government to make policy that is better informed about consequences. Under this rationale, Congress sets the basic policy objectives for an administrative agency, such as the Environmental Protection Agency or the Federal Communications Commission. But the agency is presumed to enjoy the comparative advantage of specialized expertise allowing it to access information and to assess whether a regulation would actually meet those objectives. The administrative state represents a first attempt to separate the distillation of preferences (done by Congress) and the prediction of consequences (done by agencies). This separation provides a good reason to consider how the function of an administrative agency can be updated with better information-eliciting rules.

More recently, new frameworks have tried to improve the assessment of consequences. In 1980 Congress established the Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs (OIRA) within the Office of Management and

-109-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Accelerating Democracy: Transforming Governance through Technology
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 214

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.