Banzai Babe Ruth: Baseball, Espionage, & Assassination during the 1934 Tour of Japan

By Robert K. Fitts | Go to book overview

18

The All Americans returned to Tokyo on the 6:00 a.m. Saturday, November 10, train, bursting with enthusiasm for Japan. Cars met them at Ueno Station and, after a brief stop at the hotel, drove the team to the JOAK radio station for a live broadcast to the United States and Japan. Connie Mack began the speeches. “Hello, Philadelphia, Los Angeles. I never expected to have the pleasure of talking to the baseball fans of America from Japan.”

Ruth spoke next:

Hello, folks. When I say good evening to you, this is morning
in Japan. But let me tell you, friends, the time in Japan and
America may be different by 24 hours [sic], but fair play and
sportsmanship are no different. They are just the same as I
find back home. The Japanese fans here are a serious lot. I was
surprised by their attitude. They actually respect the umpires!
That’s one thing I don’t find back home. You know what the
fans here do, folks? They actually yell at their own pitchers to
let us big leaguers hit home runs! The players here have all good
form and they play for all what they are worth. They have plenty
of courage too. They have as much enthusiasm for baseball as
have our own big leaguers.1

He went on to gush about the fans’ enthusiasm for the game, told listeners about the parade through Ginza and how fans in Chiba broke a fence at Yazu Stadium to get closer to watch a practice, and ended by telling Americans that they should visit Japan themselves.2

The Babe then introduced his teammates, who each delivered a short speech as Sotaro Suzuki translated for the Japanese listen

-142-

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Banzai Babe Ruth: Baseball, Espionage, & Assassination during the 1934 Tour of Japan
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Illustrations viii
  • Recurring Japanese Characters ix
  • Prologue xiii
  • Part 1 - "When I Say I’Ll Do Something, I Bet My Life on It." 1
  • 1 3
  • 2 12
  • 3 22
  • 4 31
  • 5 34
  • 6 39
  • 7 43
  • 8 55
  • 9 65
  • Part 2 - "Babe Ruth… Is a Great Deal More Effective Ambassador Than I Could Ever Be." 83
  • 10 85
  • 11 88
  • 12 98
  • 13 104
  • 14 113
  • 15 120
  • 16 131
  • 17 137
  • 18 142
  • Part 3 - "The Japanese Are Equal to the Americans in Strength of Spirit." 179
  • 19 181
  • 20 183
  • 21 196
  • 22 198
  • 23 208
  • 24 210
  • Part 4 - "There Will Be No War between the United States and Japan." 219
  • 25 221
  • 26 229
  • 27 234
  • 28 240
  • 29 249
  • Part 5 - "To Hell with Babe Ruth!" 259
  • 30 261
  • 31 266
  • 32 271
  • 33 281
  • 34 284
  • 35 293
  • Appendix 1- The All American Touring Party 299
  • Appendix 2- Tour Batting and Pitching Statistics 301
  • Appendix 3- Tour Game Line Scores 303
  • Acknowledgments 307
  • Notes 311
  • Bibliography 325
  • Index 335
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