The Team That Forever Changed Baseball and America: The 1947 Brooklyn Dodgers

By Lyle Spatz; Maurice Bouchard et al. | Go to book overview

Introduction

Lyle Spatz

Of the several thousand team-seasons in baseball history, only a select few stand out, and only a handful might be said to have national appeal. Foremost among those with such national appeal is the 1947 Brooklyn Dodgers, the first racially integrated Major League team of the twentieth century.

The addition of Jackie Robinson to the 1947 Dodgers changed not only baseball but also the nation. Robinson, however, was just one member of that memorable and iconic club. This was a team that had many great players on its roster, some at the beginning of their careers and some at the end. Along with Robinson, they include Carl Furillo, Gil Hodges, Pee Wee Reese, Pete Reiser, Duke Snider, Eddie Stanky, Arky Vaughan, and Dixie Walker. Also associated with the team was a quartet of baseball’s most unforgettable characters: Branch Rickey, Walter O’Malley, Leo Durocher, and Red Barber.

Several memorable subplots marked the Dodgers’ 1947 season. Just before Opening Day, Commissioner Happy Chandler suspended manager Durocher for the entire season, whereupon Rickey lured his old friend Burt Shotton out of retirement to replace him. Meanwhile, co-owner Walter O’Malley had already begun his maneuverings to take control of the club from Rickey.

Gifted outfielder Pete Reiser was again sidelined after running into an outfield fence; nevertheless, the Dodgers won the National League pennant over their old rivals, the heavily favored St. Louis Cardinals. Despite the one-game heroics of Cookie Lavagetto and Al Gionfriddo, whose feats have become part of baseball lore, they lost in a dramatic seven-game World Series to the New York Yankees.

But the biggest story of the season was Jackie Robinson. Historians have said that by joining the Dodgers in 1947, Robinson not only integrated baseball, he also set the stage for the Supreme Court’s groundbreaking Brown v. Board of Education decision in 1954 and all the civil rights legislation that followed.

During spring training, a mini-revolt by some Dodgers players opposed to Robinson’s joining the team was quashed by Durocher and Rickey. Robinson slowly overcame the enmity of some of his teammates, and he withstood the vicious assaults on his dignity from other players, managers, and fans to win the Rookie of the Year Award. Along the way, he helped the Dodgers set single-game attendance records in cities around the National League, while also changing the face (literally) of product advertisements.

For all these reasons, the 1947 Brooklyn Dodgers remain one of baseball’s most treasured teams.

-xiii-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Team That Forever Changed Baseball and America: The 1947 Brooklyn Dodgers
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 380

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.