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The Team That Forever Changed Baseball and America: The 1947 Brooklyn Dodgers

By Lyle Spatz; Maurice Bouchard et al. | Go to book overview

Chapter 48. Timeline, August 1-August 17

Lyle Spatz

Friday, August 1, at Chicago—Catcher Clyde McCullough hit a ninth-inning two-out, two-run homer off Hugh Casey to give the Cubs a 10–8 victory and end Brooklyn’s winning streak at thirteen. Joe Hatten, Hank Behrman, and Clyde King preceded Casey on the mound. Dixie Walker had three hits for Brooklyn, including a pair of doubles. 63–37, First, 9 games ahead.

Saturday, August 2, at Chicago—Chicago racked up seventeen hits against Harry Taylor and six successors on the way to a 12–7 victory. Peanuts Lowrey and Eddie Waitkus each had five hits for the winners. 63–38, First, 8 games ahead.

Sunday, August 3, at Chicago—Johnny Schmitz, who had pitched eight scoreless innings against the Dodgers in his previous start, pitched nine today. Schmitz’s 6–0 win gave Chicago a sweep of the series, while cutting Brooklyn’s lead over the Cardinals to seven games. Umpire Bill Stewart issued a warning to Brooklyn starter Ralph Branca about throwing high and tight to several Chicago batters. 63–39, First, 7 games ahead.

Monday, August 4, at Boston—Dixie Walker hit the one hundredth home run of his career, a tworun blast off Bill Voiselle in the tenth inning, to defeat the Braves 4–2. Hugh Casey pitched four and two-thirds innings in relief to earn his eighth win. Arky Vaughan had three hits for Brooklyn, while Pete Reiser and Jackie Robinson helped Casey with sparkling defensive plays. 64–39, First, 7 games ahead.

Tuesday, August 5, at Boston—Brooklyn’s lead over St. Louis dropped to six games after the Dodgers lost 4–2 to the Braves’ Johnny Sain. Boston catcher Hank Camelli had a two-run double off Hal Gregg in the sixth inning to break what had been a 2–2 tie. 64–40, First, 6 games ahead.

Wednesday, August 6, at Boston—Warren Spahn’s fourteenth win and a three-run homer by Bob Elliott off loser Joe Hatten powered the Braves to a 7–3 win. Spahn held the Dodgers to six singles and a Jackie Robinson double, as Brooklyn lost another game off its first-place lead. 64–41, First, 5 games ahead.

Thursday, August 7, at Boston—Red Barrett’s three-hitter gave Boston its third straight victory over the Dodgers. Harry Taylor went the distance and allowed only five hits in taking the 3–1 loss. Johnny Hopp had three hits and two runs batted in for the Braves. For the third consecutive day, a Brooklyn loss and a Cardinals win combined to shave a full game off the Dodgers’ lead, which was now down to four games. 64–42, First, 4 games ahead.

Friday, August 8, vs. Philadelphia—Ralph Branca threw his fourth shutout of the season as the Dodgers, playing their first game at Ebbets Field in eighteen days, defeated the Phillies 5–0. Bruce Edwards had three hits, while Eddie Stanky, Pete Reiser, Carl Furillo, and Dixie Walker each had two in leading Brooklyn’s thirteen-hit attack. 6542, First, 4 games ahead.

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