Ladies for Liberty: Women Who Made a Difference in American History

By John Blundell | Go to book overview
Save to active project

CHAPTER 3. ABIGAIL ADAMS

“I wish most sincerely there was not a slave in the province; it
always appeared a most iniquitous scheme to me to fight our-
selves for what we are daily robbing and plundering from those
who have as good a right to freedom as we have.”—Letter to John
Adams, September 1774


Revolutionary, Abolitionist, Women’s Rights Campaigner
and Entrepreneur
November 11, 1744–October 28, 1818

BRAINTREE, MASSACHUSETTS

Until Barbara Bush, ABIGAIL ADAMS was the only woman to be a wife and a mother to a President of the United States. She was the wife of the second President John Adams (1797–1801) and the mother of the sixth John Quincy Adams (1825–1829). She did not live long enough to see her son inaugurated but she did stand with him, aged not quite eight years old, on a hilltop near their home on June 17, 1775 watching the British lose a thousand men as they won a Pyrrhic victory at the Battle of Bunker Hill. For every eight or more dead Redcoats there was only one dead patriot. The experience was a valuable lesson for

-25-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
Loading One moment ...
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Ladies for Liberty: Women Who Made a Difference in American History
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen
/ 218

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.

Are you sure you want to delete this highlight?