Ladies for Liberty: Women Who Made a Difference in American History

By John Blundell | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 18. ROSE DIRECTOR FRIEDMAN

“Tolerance is the secret of a successful family life, as it is of a suc-
cessful society.”—Rose Friedman


Economist, Author, Political Activist
December 1911–April 18, 2009

CHICAGO, ILLINOIS

It was a chance meeting but it really changed the world of economics. When graduate economics student Rose Director joined a class in basic price theory at the University of Chicago in 1932, her teacher Professor Jacob Viner sat his students alphabetically by second name. Rose found herself placed next to a brilliant Rutgers graduate, Milton Friedman, and so began a relationship that was to lead not only to their marriage six years later but also to one of the greatest intellectual collaborations of the twentieth century.

ROSE DIRECTOR FRIEDMAN was the major driving force behind many of her husband’s books, including the jointly written seminal work Free to Choose (1980) and co-producer with him of the ten-part television series of the same name. The book was an international bestseller and, with the TV series broadcast in every major western country

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Ladies for Liberty: Women Who Made a Difference in American History
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page v
  • Table of Contents ix
  • Foreword 1
  • Introduction 5
  • Chapter 1- Mercy Otis Warren 7
  • Chapter 2- Martha Washington 17
  • Chapter 3- Abigail Adams 25
  • Chapter 4- The GrimkÉ Sisters 35
  • Chapter 5- Sojourner Truth 49
  • Chapter 6- Elizabeth Cady Stanton 59
  • Chapter 7- Harriet Tubman 67
  • Chapter 8- Harriet Beecher Stowe 77
  • Chapter 9- Bina West Miller 83
  • Chapter 10- Madam C J Walker 91
  • Chapter 11- Laura Ingalls Wilder and Rose Wilder Lane 101
  • Chapter 12- Isabel Mary Paterson 111
  • Chapter 13- Lila Acheson Wallace 121
  • Chapter 14- Vivien Kellems 131
  • Chapter 15- Taylor Caldwell 141
  • Chapter 16- Clare Boothe Luce 149
  • Chapter 17- Ayn Rand 161
  • Chapter 18- Rose Director Friedman 173
  • Chapter 19- Jane Jacobs 185
  • Chapter 20- Dorian Fisher 195
  • Afterword 201
  • Ten Matters for Discussion 205
  • Further Reading 207
  • Acknowledgements 211
  • Index 213
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