Ladies for Liberty: Women Who Made a Difference in American History

By John Blundell | Go to book overview

AFTERWORD
As I finished writing the stories of my “Ladies for Liberty,” word about this book spread and I began to receive speaking invitations to address this theme. Typically, I spoke a little about all of them; then I explored three to five in depth, and finally drew out some lessons.Here are the ten lessons I gave to the staff of the Liberty Fund on September 8, 2010, at its headquarters in Indianapolis, Indiana.
1. I am puzzled by the temperance movement, which hardly ever appears in my text (my choice); but all the ladies of the mid to late 19th century are pro-temperance while all the ladies of the mid 20th century such as Paterson, Luce and Rand voted for FDR in 1932 solely because he pledged to end Prohibition. I think the answer is rooted in property rights. The married ladies circa 1850 had no such rights and could not stop a wayward husband from drinking away their shared fortune; the ladies of circa 1930 had far more rights and were appalled by the crimes induced by Prohibition.
2. The pattern of education of these women is very erratic, to put it mildly, and the word “bored” appeared repeatedly in my research. In the revolutionary era, the tutors of the brothers did the job to some extent. Truth and Tubman were illiterate while Madam CJ Walker made great strides at self improvement as an adult. Cady Stanton benefited from fam

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