The Subtle Revolution: Poets of the "Old Schools" during Late Qing and Early Republican China

By Jon Eugene Von Kowallis | Go to book overview

CHAPTER ONE
Wang Kaiyun, Deng Fulun, and the
“Neo-Ancient” School

During the period between the late Daoguang reign era and the early Xianfeng reign era (i.e., the years around 1850), the poetry of mid-Qing masters such as Yuan Mei (zi Zicai, hao Jianzhai, alt. Suiyuan Laoren; 1716–1798), Zhao Yi (zi Yunsong, hao Oubei; 1727–1814), and Shu Wei (zi Liren, hao Tieyun; 1765–1816) still held sway in terms of popularity and influence.1 Theirs has been typified as an individually oriented and creative, though disinterested, poetry geared primarily toward the entertainment of its writers and the diversion of its gentry readership. It was against such a literary backdrop and after China’s defeat in the Opium War that Wang Kaiyun together with Deng Fulun and Deng Yi, two brothers from Wugang; Long Rulin from You xian (county); and Li Shourong from Changsha formed the Orchid Grove Poetry Society (Lanlin shishe) in 1851. These “Five Talents of Hunan” eventually began to work toward a revival of both “recent” and ancient-style verse as a vehicle for serious poetic comment. In Jiangxi, where the influence of rival schools was particularly strong, Gao Xinkui from Hukou, Fan Yuanheng from Dehua, and Xu Zhenyi from Fengxin are said to have “responded to the poetic impetus” of the Lanlin shishe.2

In his youth Wang Kaiyun had studied the Lisao and developed a strong admiration for the poems of the Han, Wei, and Six Dynasties. He regarded the movement for a return to ancient

1 Kurata Sadayoshi places Wu Songliang (the author of Xiangsushanguan shiji, pub. 1843) in the position of Zhao Yi and Shu Wei in his assessment of Wang Kaiyun’s predecessors. But Wu was, in fact, a less prominent figure at the time. Cf. Kurata, p. 207.

2 Ibid., p. 207. Qian Jibo (1986), p. 39, gives the name as Lanling cishe (Orchid Hill Lyric Society).

-22-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Subtle Revolution: Poets of the "Old Schools" during Late Qing and Early Republican China
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 306

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.