After Jonathan Edwards: The Courses of the New England Theology

By Oliver D. Crisp; Douglas A. Sweeney | Go to book overview

Contributors

James P. Byrd is the associate dean for graduate education and research at Vanderbilt University Divinity School in Nashville, Tennessee. His current book project, under contract with Oxford University Press, focuses on the Bible and patriotism in Revolutionary America. In addition to various articles and reviews, he has previously published two books, Jonathan Edwards for Armchair Theologians (WJK, 2008) and The Challenges of Roger Williams (Mercer University Press, 2002).

Oliver D. Crisp is professor of systematic theology at Fuller Theological Seminary in Pasadena, California. He has written Jonathan Edwards and the Metaphysics of Sin (Ashgate, 2005) and Jonathan Edwards on God and Creation (Oxford University Press, 2013) and with Paul Helm has co-edited Jonathan Edwards: Philosophical Theologian (Ashgate, 2003). He is currently completing Jonathan Edwards: An Introduction to His Thought (T&T Clark, 2013). He has also published a number of essays and articles on the theology of Jonathan Edwards and the New Divinity.

Allen Guelzo is Henry Luce III Professor of the Civil War Era at Gettysburg College in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania. Among his many publications are Edwards and the Will: A Century of Theological Debate (Wesleyan University Press, 1989). With Douglas Sweeney he co-edited The New England Theology: From Jonathan Edwards to Edwards Amasa Park (Baker Academic, 2006).

Charles Hambrick-Stowe is pastor of the First Congregational Church of Ridgefield, Connecticut. His publications include a number of articles and book chapters on Jonathan Edwards, the Great Awakening, and the New Divinity. He is the author of The Practice of Piety: Puritan Devotional Disciplines in Seventeenth-Century New England (University of North Carolina Press, 1982), Early New England Meditative Poetry: Anne Bradstreet and Edward Taylor (Paulist Press, 1988), and Charles G. Finney and the Spirit of American Evangelicalism (Eerdmans, 1996); he co-edited, with Douglas A. Sweeney, Holding on to the Faith: Confessional Traditions in American Christianity (University Press of America, 2008).

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