After Jonathan Edwards: The Courses of the New England Theology

By Oliver D. Crisp; Douglas A. Sweeney | Go to book overview

Notes

INTRODUCTION

1. Edwards Amasa Park, “New England Theology,” Bibliotheca Sacra 9 (1852), 169–217. This essay was part of the “paper war” between Park and Charles Hodge (and others), about which theological school actually represented the legitimate developments of Edwards’s ideas. Although Hodge and the “Old Light” Presbyterians expended considerable energy in trying to wrest Edwards from the New England theologians, Park seems to have had the better part of the controversy. His essay offers a sophisticated and nuanced treatment of topics in Edwardsian theology, which Hodge was unable to match. It is, as Douglas Sweeney and Allen Guelzo have recently put it, “the Urtext for those assessing Edwards’s role in New England’s theological ancestry.” From Sweeney and Guelzo, eds. The New England Theology: From Jonathan Edwards to Edwards Amasa Park (Grand Rapids: Baker Academic, 2006), 257.

2. Park, “New England Theology.”

3. Gerald McDermott and Michael McClymond explain the history and development of different designations for the New England Theology and offer an overview of the debate about when the movement actually began in The Theology of Jonathan Edwards (New York: Oxford University Press, 2011), chap. 38.

4. YE1: 362–363.

5. Ibid., 179.

6. See Edwards Jr. “Three Sermons on the Necessity of Atonement and the Consistency Between that and Free Grace in Forgiveness,” in Edwards Amasa Park, The Atonement: Discourses and Treatises by Edwards, Smalley, Maxcy, Emmons, Griffin, Burge and Weeks (Boston: Congregational Board of Publication, 1859), 1–42.

-258-

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