Animal Rights: What Everyone Needs to Know

By Paul Waldau | Go to book overview

6
POLITICAL REALITIES

Long-standing problems of humans harming other humans still command enormous amounts of time in our political discussions, even as new issues like global warming and public health threats clamor for attention. Whether morally based concerns for harms to other animals will be given a voice in future political discussions is a hotly debated topic. Politics, it turns out, has long been extremely narrow-minded. The words “political,” “policy,” “police,” and “polite” stem from the Greek word polis, which means “city.” Since Greek cities were typically walled off from the outside world, discussions of citybased matters and passions were understandably not particularly connected to nonhuman animals. While there were some ancient discussions driven by passions for “countryside” or “nature,” and today in some political discussions people talk of “the environment” and even “wilderness,” the concerns that most decisively shape political discussions still remain humancentered in ways that cause participants not to consider the relevance of animals to much of human life.


What are the political realities for animals today?

The discussions regarding animal issues now going forward in individual societies and their legislatures, as well as in the global community generally, are pushed by a diverse range of

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Animal Rights: What Everyone Needs to Know
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface xi
  • 1 - General Information 1
  • 2 - The Animals Themselves 10
  • 3 - Philosophical Arguments 56
  • 4 - History and Culture 74
  • 5 - Laws 81
  • 6 - Political Realities 104
  • 7 - Social Realities 129
  • 8 - Education, the Professions, and the Arts 143
  • 9 - Contemporary Sciences– Natural and Social 162
  • 10 - Major Figures and Organizations in the Animal Rights Movement 173
  • 11 - The Future of Animal Rights 189
  • Time Line/Chronology of Important Events 201
  • Glossary 205
  • Suggestions for Further Reading 209
  • Index 215
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