Animal Rights: What Everyone Needs to Know

By Paul Waldau | Go to book overview

INDEX
academic ethics. See ethics
Adams, Carol, 178–79
advocacy, xii, 4, 125, 179
and “all animals,” 22, 57 (see also sacred rights of all beings)
of animal welfare (see rights versus welfare debate)
within China, 185
and companion animals, 30
for endangered species, 125
and enforcement of existing laws, 93
by government agencies, 92, 105, 119
of human superiority, 94–95
for humans and nonhumans, 174, 175 (see also animal protection movement, benefits for humans of)
within India, 184, 185
within theological circles, 175
against zoos, 139
for zoos, 138
Africa, 76, 79, 183. See also South Africa
African gray parrots, 186. See also Alex the Gray Parrot
agribusiness. See industrialized uses of animals
ahimsa. See nonviolence
Alex the Gray Parrot, 20, 115, 171
alternatives movement, 29, 117–18
and reduction, 118
and refinement, 118
and replacement, 117–18
Three R’s of Russell and Burch’s The Principles of Humane Experimental Technique (1959) 29, 117
American Academy of Religion, 160
American Association of Geographers, 160
American Bar Association, 86, 160
American Philosophical Association, 159
American Psychological Association, 160
American Sociological Association, 160
ancient concerns for nonhuman animals, xi, 3, 8, 9, 54, 70, 74–78, 132, 186
for all animals, 22, 133
art forms and, 160
for cats and dogs, 27
for communities of other animals, 171
food animal slaughter, 38, 44, 45 (see also husbandry traditions)

-215-

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Animal Rights: What Everyone Needs to Know
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface xi
  • 1 - General Information 1
  • 2 - The Animals Themselves 10
  • 3 - Philosophical Arguments 56
  • 4 - History and Culture 74
  • 5 - Laws 81
  • 6 - Political Realities 104
  • 7 - Social Realities 129
  • 8 - Education, the Professions, and the Arts 143
  • 9 - Contemporary Sciences– Natural and Social 162
  • 10 - Major Figures and Organizations in the Animal Rights Movement 173
  • 11 - The Future of Animal Rights 189
  • Time Line/Chronology of Important Events 201
  • Glossary 205
  • Suggestions for Further Reading 209
  • Index 215
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