Between the Lines: Literary Transnationalism and African American Poetics

By Monique-Adelle Callahan | Go to book overview

Chapter Four
Prison Breaks: Modes of Escape in
Auta de Souza’s Poetics of Freedom

Numa cultura em que a mulher era idealizada como esteio
da família e pilar moral da formação de “homens de bem”
para a sociedade, a educação, a escritura e a autoria
femininas foram tacitamente relegadas. Para transfor-
marem-se em profissionais da escrita, essas mulheres
tiveram de redefinir seu papel. Tiveram de ousar. No meu
entendimento, Auta de Souza foi uma delas
.

[In a culture in which the woman was idealized as the
support for the family and moral pillar in the formation of
“good men” for society, the education, writing, and
authorship by women were tacitly relegated. In order to
transform themselves into professional writers, these
women had to redefine their role. They had to be daring. To
my understanding, Auta de Souza was one of these such
women.]

—Ana Laudelina Ferreira Gomes

No caso brasileiro, no tocante às mulheres negras, sabemos
que no passado por força do regime escravista eram
submetidas a todo tipo de exploração desumana, sexual,
servil, despojadas de seus filhos, assassinadas, violentadas
e perseguidas quando na tentativa de livrarem-se das
opressões. Evidentemente este sistema não favorecia a
alfabetização e muito menos a aquisição de conhecimentos
intelectuais. Apesar disto, a participação da mulher negra
na composição e resistência cultural é significativa em
todos os setores. No tocante à literatura Auta de Souza
chega até nós como exceção deste quandro de silêncio
.

[In the Brazilian case, as far as black women are concerned,
we know that in the past, due to the power of the institution
of slavery, they were subject to all kinds of inhuman,
sexual, servile exploitation, robbed of their children,
murdered, raped, and persecuted when they tried to free

-96-

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