Crisis of Conservatism? The Republican Party, the Conservative Movement and American Politics after Bush

By Joel D. Aberbach; Gillian Peele | Go to book overview

8
The Struggles of an “Orthodox Innovator”
George W. Bush, the Conservative Movement, and Domestic Policy

JON HERBERT

The “conservative movement” is widely regarded as a coalition, either of ideas or of institutions. The movement can be considered a loose association, expressing itself at mass and elite levels, through think tanks, individual academics and schools, journalists, interest groups, mass membership organizations, members of the public, and internet sites. Equally, the movement can be perceived as an amalgam of people advocating interrelated ideas, among whom could be included libertarians, advocates of limited government, free marketeers, fiscal conservatives, business and financial interests, those advocating state and local government power, traditionalists both social and economic, family values advocates, certain Christian groups, single-issue campaigners, national security hawks, anticommunists, and neoconservatives. Over recent decades, elements of this movement have found public voice in politics through the Republican Party. Hence, much of the movement welcomed the first George W. Bush administration. This enthusiasm seemed reinforced by a president who, campaign rhetoric notwithstanding, quickly adapted to Washington’s extreme partisanship and mobilized Republican congressional majorities on many issues.1 Furthermore, an electoral strategy based on mobilizing the conservative base, rather than presidential candidates’ traditional appeal to the center, suggested Bush would maintain a close relationship with the conservative movement.2 Yet by 2008, the movement appeared in disarray, perhaps even moving toward civil war. Respected movement leaders published titles such as Conservatives Betrayed and Impostor: How George W. Bush Bankrupted America and Betrayed the Reagan Legacy.3 The Bush betrayal featured repeatedly in right-wing explanations of the 2008 election results. While Bush’s foreign policy drew criticism, conservatives were most exercised over domestic policy.

This chapter examines four of Bush’s domestic policy initiatives: reforms of education, Medicare, Social Security, and immigration. Each is considered in terms of its congruence with conservative ideologies, conservative responses to the

-151-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Crisis of Conservatism? The Republican Party, the Conservative Movement and American Politics after Bush
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 403

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.