Inequality and Instability: A Study of the World Economy Just before the Great Crisis

By James K. Galbraith | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 12
Inequality in Cuba after
the Soviet Collapse

The case of Cuba is practicallyunique: a countrywhose government remained not only nominally but in fact communist all the way through the first decade of the twenty-first century, and with possibly (until his retirement in 2008) the longest-serving head of government in the world. It is also a country whose internal workings remain obscure to most American economists, thanks to the long-standing embargo, the difficulty of travel even for academic purposes, and the resulting low level of contact.1 Nevertheless, like other countries Cuba maintains economic statistics, and as elsewhere they can be mined for information.

Cuba followed a path unlike practically all other socialist countries after the fall of the Soviet Union. Two differences are especially noteworthy. First, there was no economic transition from a socialist model to one based on market principles. Although the political and social project that the Cuban revolution embraced was severely affected by the demise of the USSR, Cuba’s government did not abandon the declared goal of an egalitarian society under state socialism. Second, there was no political collapse; the authority of the Castro brothers and of the Communist Party remained intact. These facts were entirely remarkable given the severity of the economic crisis, which may have been deeper than anywhere else in the post-Soviet world except possibly within the former Soviet Union itself. Unlike the countries of Eastern Europe, Cuba had nowhere to turn in 1991; it would not begin to replace the lost Soviet aid—especially subsidized oil—until after Hugo Chavez came to power in Venezuela in 1999.

This chapter analyzes the evolution of pay inequality in Cuba from the early 1990s through 2004, covering what was called the “Special Period in Times of Peace”—the difficult years following the collapse of the USSR.2 The data are

-269-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Inequality and Instability: A Study of the World Economy Just before the Great Crisis
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 324

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.