Policing the Roman Empire: Soldiers, Administration, and Public Order

By Christopher J. Fuhrmann | Go to book overview

5
“To squelch the discord of the rabble”:
Military Policing in Rome and Italy
under Augustus’s Successors

IT TOOK AUGUSTUS more than fifty years to remold his reputation, from warlord to symbol of domestic peace and stability. The success of his efforts can be measured by his successor’s desire to associate himself with Augustus’s perceived achievements.1 Tiberius’s subordinates played along. In fact, obedience to Tiberius was linked to the honor owed to Augustus, to such an extent that an offense against one registered as a slight to the other. Note, for example, the recently discovered senatorial decree condemning the memory of Gnaeus Piso, who was not only accused of directly violating the cult of divus Augustus but was also charged with trying “to stir up civil war, all the evils of which have long since been banished by the divine guidance of the deified Augustus and by the virtues of Tiberius Caesar Augustus.”2

The police apparatus that Augustus established in Rome helped Tiberius secure his rule. In Tacitus’s account of the transfer of power, soldiers keenly guarded the ailing Augustus and his wife as they waited for Tiberius to arrive. As soon as Augustus died, an officer was specially instructed to kill Augustus’s exiled grandson, Tiberius’s potential rival. Tiberius quickly made sure that he had the loyalty of the soldiers, above all the praetorians; he

1. See, e.g., Tac. Ann. 1.77. Lyasse, Le Principat, appreciates the individual complexities of this emulation for each of Augustus’s first-century successors. Cf. de Blois, The Policy of the Em peror Gallienus, 120–49; Cooley, “Septimius Severus”; and Barnes, “Aspects of the Severan Empire.”

2. On Piso’s supposed violations of Augustus’s religious rites, see SC de Pisone 68–70. Quoted are lines 45–47: bellum etiam civile excitare conatus sit, iam pridem numine Divi Aug(usti) virtutibusq(ue) Ti. Caesaris Aug(usti) omnibus civilis belli sepultis malis. Gnaeus Piso the Elder was accused of murdering Germanicus and challenging imperial authority early in Tiberius’s reign (AD 20). This text was first published in 1996 by Eck et al. in Das Senatus consultum; also see the 1999 special issue of the American Journal of Philology, vol. 120, no. 1; Rowe, Princes; and Flower, The Art of Forgetting, 132–38. For other links between loyalty to Tiberius and devotion to Augustus’s memory, see Tac. Ann. 3.66 and the opening of the Pisidian inscription (JRS 66, 107–9) in Mitchell, “Requisitioned Transport” (discussed further below).

-123-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Policing the Roman Empire: Soldiers, Administration, and Public Order
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 330

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.