Sexual Morality: A Natural Law Approach to Intimate Relationships

By John J. Piderit | Go to book overview

14
Drinking and Drugs
LOOKING OUT FOR YOURSELF AND YOUR FRIENDS

THE DRINKING SCENE is a central component of social life for college students and young adults in the United States. It is also a mainstay of hook-up culture. According to one of the students profiled in Sex and the Soul, people are less inhibited when they drink, and getting drunk enables them to do things they won’t remember the next day—things they might well be ashamed of doing. While Donna Freitas, the author, found that most random hooking-up was not associated with getting drunk, drinking and often getting drunk are synonymous with socializing in the minds of most college students.

Of course, not all young people drink alcohol, and many drink quite moderately. Nonetheless, college students are familiar with the scene at many bars or off-campus parties: large amounts of alcohol available at low prices. This combination results in many young people drinking to excess. Most young people understand that someone who drinks alone has a problem. They might also think that a pattern of binge-drinking is worrisome. However, few seem to believe that the excessive drinking many young people do in their college years and beyond is a big deal, much less something requiring friendly collaboration.


PRACTICAL REASONABLENESS AND GETTING DRUNK

Excessive drinking is certainly a social issue, but it is also a moral issue that natural law helps us to understand. According to natural law, drinking alcohol is permissible.

-117-

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