Sexual Morality: A Natural Law Approach to Intimate Relationships

By John J. Piderit | Go to book overview

20
Sex, Contraceptives, and Children

AN IMPORTANT COMPONENT of marriage is the generation of children. Until about forty years ago, desiring to have and bearing children was considered a normal activity in marriage. Even this, however, has become problematic in modern society. Many a developed society now experiences a negative population growth rate because couples, whether married or unmarried, are having so few children.


CONTRACEPTIVES

Human sexual desire and expression draw individuals outside of themselves into an intimate communion with another. As part of their love and commitment to one another, at least until recently, couples have experienced a strong desire that their love produce children. The commitment to each other is the source of the desire to have children and is the basis for anticipating that the couple will be able to care for children resulting from the sexual act. Sexual acts should be motivated by mutual commitment to one another and the acts should be open to God using this occasion to bring forth new human life and sustain it.

Children’s lives depend on the readiness of their parents to accept them. We know that infants in the womb are influenced by the attitudes of the mother, whose attitudes are in turn influenced by the father of the developing child. The security

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