The Rise and Fall of Franklin Delano Roosevelt

By Robert Underhill | Go to book overview

FOREWORD

It is said that an experienced oceanographer can examine an incoming tide and learn of events which happened far out at sea. Likewise, those who study an historical event will be drawn into examining happenings leading up to it. The rabble in arms that sparked the Revolutionary War can be understood only by knowing something about disgruntled settlers in colonial America when ruled by overseers from abroad. Those who want to understand our country’s Civil War will have to study sectional rivalries, differing social patterns, and economic conditions in the North and South during that period.

At the equator, the earth’s diameter is approximately 25,000 miles, and maps tell us that from the Balkan Peninsula to Hawaii is nearly half that distance—a space demanding over fifteen hours of flight time for most travelers. Connections between an assassination in Sarajevo, Yugoslavia in 1914 and an attack on Pearl Harbor, Hawaii in 1941—twentyseven years later, therefore, might appear at first blush to be unrelated. The years between the two dates, slightly more than one-third of a human’s life span according to modern reckoning, would seem long, yet with instantaneous communication and in the world’s history, the interlude becomes infinitesimal.

World War I reduced most of Western Europe to rubble, and in the aftermath of that debacle extreme poverty, due in large part to the harshness of peace treaties, swept over the defeated nations. The hardships of those times made it inevitable that some governments would attempt recovery through authoritarian and military means. Choosing such routes

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The Rise and Fall of Franklin Delano Roosevelt
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page v
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Table of Contents xiii
  • Foreword 1
  • Chapter 1- Europe after the First World War 3
  • Chapter 2- America’s Great Depression 11
  • Chapter 3- Franklin Roosevelt- The Early Years 17
  • Chapter 4- FDR- Emerging Politician 23
  • Chapter 5- Seizing the Crown 27
  • Chapter 6- Advisors and Aides 31
  • Chapter 7- FDR- First Media President 39
  • Chapter 8- Supreme Court Imbroglio 43
  • Chapter 9- Europe’s War–1939 53
  • Chapter 10- Third Term 59
  • Chapter 11- Lend Lease 69
  • Chapter 12- Intervention or Isolation 77
  • Chapter 13- Barbarossa 91
  • Chapter 14- Troubled Waters 101
  • Chapter 15- Americana 1941 109
  • Chapter 16- The Labor Front 113
  • Chapter 17- From Marriage to Alliance 119
  • Chapter 18- Empire of the Rising Sun 127
  • Chapter 19- Atlantic Charter 133
  • Chapter 20- Enter the Scientists 141
  • Chapter 21- Undeclared War 1941 147
  • Chapter 22- Russia- The Enigma 153
  • Chapter 23- Japan- Expansion and Perfidy 161
  • Chapter 24- Infamy 171
  • Chapter 25- FDR- A Reckoning 179
  • Bibliography 195
  • Notes 199
  • Index 209
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