The Rise and Fall of Franklin Delano Roosevelt

By Robert Underhill | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 12. INTERVENTION OR ISOLATION

“President Roosevelt’s foreign policy is a sort of shooting
craps with destiny.”

—General Hugh Johnson in 1940, former NRA Director

_____________________

The years of 1940 and 1941 were anything but tranquil in the United States. Interventionists charged FDR was not doing enough to help the western Allies, and isolationists insisted he was rushing America into Europe’s war.

Debates between interventionists and isolationists during the period is a complicated story and one involving important personages including not only FDR, his followers in Washington and in the U.S. Congress but others like Joseph Patrick Kennedy of Massachusetts and Charles A. Lindbergh, quintessential American hero of the 1920s.

Kennedy had amassed his fortune by using a vanguard of allies drawn from barons in Boston, Wall Street, Hollywood, and other power centers. In the spring of 1930, believing that drastic changes would have to be made in the nation’s economic system, he had hitched his moneyed chariot to Franklin Roosevelt’s run for the governorship of New York. In November of that year, citizens in the Empire State amassed a landslide vote to push FDR into the chair at Albany, and Joseph Kennedy told his wife that the new governor was the man who would save the country. His early assessment was not wrong.

Kennedy liked to think of himself as one of the few men who could talk to FDR on equal terms. Actually, both men were of the same type

-77-

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The Rise and Fall of Franklin Delano Roosevelt
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page v
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Table of Contents xiii
  • Foreword 1
  • Chapter 1- Europe after the First World War 3
  • Chapter 2- America’s Great Depression 11
  • Chapter 3- Franklin Roosevelt- The Early Years 17
  • Chapter 4- FDR- Emerging Politician 23
  • Chapter 5- Seizing the Crown 27
  • Chapter 6- Advisors and Aides 31
  • Chapter 7- FDR- First Media President 39
  • Chapter 8- Supreme Court Imbroglio 43
  • Chapter 9- Europe’s War–1939 53
  • Chapter 10- Third Term 59
  • Chapter 11- Lend Lease 69
  • Chapter 12- Intervention or Isolation 77
  • Chapter 13- Barbarossa 91
  • Chapter 14- Troubled Waters 101
  • Chapter 15- Americana 1941 109
  • Chapter 16- The Labor Front 113
  • Chapter 17- From Marriage to Alliance 119
  • Chapter 18- Empire of the Rising Sun 127
  • Chapter 19- Atlantic Charter 133
  • Chapter 20- Enter the Scientists 141
  • Chapter 21- Undeclared War 1941 147
  • Chapter 22- Russia- The Enigma 153
  • Chapter 23- Japan- Expansion and Perfidy 161
  • Chapter 24- Infamy 171
  • Chapter 25- FDR- A Reckoning 179
  • Bibliography 195
  • Notes 199
  • Index 209
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