Speaking American: A History of English in the United States

By Richard W. Bailey | Go to book overview

References

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Ade, George. 1903. In Babel: Stories of Chicago. New York: McClure, Phillips & Co.; Albany: J. Munsel.

Ade, George. 1972. Fables inz Slang (1899). [New York:] Westvaco Corporation.

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Allen, L[ouis] L[eonidas]. 1848. A Thrilling Sketch of the Life of the Distinguished Chief Okah Tubbee. New York: [Cameron’s Steam Power Presses].

Allen, Paula Gunn. 2003. Pocahontas: Medicine Woman, Spy, Entrepreneur, Diplomat. San Francisco: Harper-Collins.

Alleyne, Warren, and Henry Fraser. 1988. The Barbados-Carolina Connection. London: Macmillan Caribbean.

Allsopp, Richard. 1996. Dictionary of Caribbean English Usage. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

“An American.” [1775?]. The Yankies War Hoop. London: G. King.

Anghiera, Pietro Martire d’. 1516. De orbe nouo decades. [Alcalá de Henares]: Arnaldi Guillelmi.

Arnold, Theodore. [1748.] Grammatica Anglicana Concentrata. Philadelphia: Gotthard Armbruster.

Axtell, James. 2001. “Babel of Tongues: Communicating with the Indians in Eastern North America.” In Gray and Fiering, 15–60.

Babbitt, E. H. 1896. “The English Language of the Lower Classes in New York City and Vicinity.” Dialect Notes 9:457–64.

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Speaking American: A History of English in the United States
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents ix
  • Editorial Note xi
  • Preface xiii
  • Acknowledgments xvii
  • 1- Introduction 3
  • 2- Chesapeake Bay, before 1650 16
  • 3- Boston, 1650–1700 27
  • 4- Charleston, 1700–1750 48
  • 5- Philadelphia, 1750–1800 72
  • 6- New Orleans, 1800–1850 98
  • 7- New York, 1850–1900 121
  • 8- Chicago, 1900–1950 139
  • 9- Los Angeles, 1950–2000 162
  • 10- Epilogue 183
  • References 185
  • Index 199
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