The Original Compromise: What the Constitution's Framers Were Really Thinking

By David Brian Robertson | Go to book overview

PRINCIPAL SPEAKERS AT THE CONVENTION

Gunning Bedford Jr., Delaware

David Brearly, Maryland

Pierce Butler, South Carolina

Daniel Carroll, Maryland

John Dickinson, Delaware

Oliver Ellsworth, Connecticut

Elbridge Gerry, Massachusetts

Nathaniel Gorham, Massachusetts

Benjamin Franklin, Pennsylvania

Alexander Hamilton, New York

William Samuel Johnson, Connecticut

Rufus King, Massachusetts

John Langdon, New Hampshire

William Livingston, New Jersey

James Madison, Virginia

Luther Martin, Maryland

George Mason, Virginia

Gouverneur Morris, Pennsylvania

William Paterson, New Jersey

Charles Pinckney, South Carolina

General (Charles Cotesworth) Pinckney, South Carolina

Edmund J. Randolph, Virginia

George Read, Delaware

John Rutledge, South Carolina

Roger Sherman, Connecticut

Hugh Williamson, North Carolina

James Wilson, Pennsylvania


Other Delegates Who Contributed to the Debates

Abraham Baldwin, Georgia

William Blount, North Carolina

Jacob Broom, Delaware

George Clymer, Pennsylvania

William R. Davie, North Carolina

Jonathan Dayton, New Jersey

Thomas Fitzsimons, Pennsylvania

William Houstoun, Georgia

Daniel of St. Thomas Jenifer, Maryland

John Lansing Jr., New York

James McClurg, Virginia

James McHenry, Maryland

John F. Mercer, Maryland

William Pierce, Georgia

Richard D. Spaight, North Carolina

Caleb Strong, Massachusetts

George Washington, Virginia (Convention President)

George Wythe, Virginia

-xv-

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