The Original Compromise: What the Constitution's Framers Were Really Thinking

By David Brian Robertson | Go to book overview

1
Introduction

The founders of their nation fascinate Americans, but their Constitution created a government that often mystifies them. What is the logic behind it? What were the Constitution’s framers trying to accomplish in 1787? Why did they create the United States Congress, the presidency, the courts, and the federal system the way they did? How did they expect these parts to work together? These questions are vital now. We cannot understand today’s United States without understanding the thinking behind the Constitution.

The Constitution shapes American life today. The Constitution still provides the framework for the way the U.S. government makes laws, defends the nation, and provides for Americans’ prosperity. The U.S. House of Representatives and the Senate still must agree completely whenever they make a law. States with large populations, like New York, still have far more seats in the House of Representatives than small states like Delaware; in the Senate, however, each state is represented by two senators no matter how small or large its population. The president, at the head of a separate and independent executive branch, still wields the power to veto Congress’s bills, to appoint important officials with the Senate’s consent, and to command the nation’s military. Judges on U.S. courts are still appointed to the bench under the original rules, and the U.S. judicial branch is still very independent of the other branches. The states still control a wide range of policies that directly affect all Americans, such as policy toward crime and punishment, marriage and family, and business and labor. The Constitution still orchestrates the rhythms of American politics, with Congressional elections every two years, presidential elections every four, and an Electoral College that chooses the president even if his opponent wins the popular vote.

As I studied the founding, I discovered that there is no book that explains the framers’ reasoning during the meeting that produced this durable Constitution. This book addresses the unfilled need for a narrative of the Constitutional Convention’s logic that is accurate, understandable, and drawn primarily from the actual records of the Convention itself.

-3-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Original Compromise: What the Constitution's Framers Were Really Thinking
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 326

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.