The Original Compromise: What the Constitution's Framers Were Really Thinking

By David Brian Robertson | Go to book overview

INDEX
Adair, Douglass, 13
Adams, John, 6, 32, 131, 146
Affordable Care Act (2010), 205
African-Americans, 119, 178–91, 235
agency, 81–83, 96, 116, 121, 123
agriculture. See farms, farmers and agriculture
Al Q aeda, 215
ambition, 13, 18, 26, 28, 49, 52, 55–56, 69, 73, 76, 101, 110–11, 114, 132, 167, 206, 230, 232, 234, 269n68
amendment, process of in the Constitution, 65, 221–23
amendments to the Constitution, See Constitution, U.S., amendments
American Revolution, 39, 41, 62, 68, 100, 167, 200, 208, 214
Americans, nature of, 40–42, 53
Anderson, Thornton, 12
Annapolis Convention, 5, 57
Anti-Federalists, 11, 32, 70, 157, 175, 214, 227–28
appointments, executive and judicial, 3, 50–51, 99, 106, 116, 124, 130, 139–40, 145, 209, 285n135
army, 206–9, 224
Arthur, Chester Alan, 147
Articles of Confederation, 19, 25, 27, 30, 36, 40–41, 58, 61–63, 121, 150, 164, 173, 193, 218, 220–21, 232
assembly, freedom of, 158
attainder, 155, 287n62
authority and power, national government, 15–17, 19, 55, 57, 59–60, 64, 69, 73, 81, 164, 176, 224, 232, 289n28
ambiguous division of national and state authority, 163, 204, 206, 214, 224
difficulty of using, 233–34
economic, 192–205, 231
elastic, 173–74
enumerated powers, 163–64, 172–73, 176
incremental reforms, 69, 71–72, 76, 99, 69, 272n29
link to Congressional apportionment, 60, 178
military, 206–14
need to strengthen, 8, 63, 69, 74, 145, 178
opportunity to strengthen, 36
redistribution, constraints on, 194, 197–98
regulation, expansion of, 205
threat to small and economically vulnerable states, 68
use of force against a state, 64–65, 72, 165, 169, 209, 238
authority and power, state government, 163, 166, 176, 190, 192, 206, 231–32
ambiguous division of national and state, 163, 171–73, 204, 206, 214, 224, 232
prohibited powers, 173, 194–95, 198–200
states retain “numerous and indefinite” powers, 176
Bailyn, Bernard, 10, 13
Baldwin, Abraham
authority and power, national, 98
slave trade, 187
stronger national government, 7
Baltimore, 198
Bank of the United States, 176, 204
bankruptcy, 192, 201
Barbary pirates, 27, 262n7
Beard, Charles A., 12–13
Beck, Glenn, 10
Bedford, Gunning Jr., 231
authority and power, national, broad, 172
Connecticut Compromise, 102–3
delegates, motives of, 26
national government, strengthening, 36
presidential term, 134
veto, executive, 142
veto, national of state laws, 166–67
Virginia Plan, motives behind, 101

-303-

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