The Role of Parliament in Curbing Corruption

By Rick Stapenhurst; Niall Johnston et al. | Go to book overview

Preface

Corruption is a disease that threatens the hopes of the poor: for a better future for themselves and their children. It drains finances that might otherwise go to programs that bring education within reach of poor children, or that offer health care to an ailing farmer or a young mother.

Parliamentarians have been entrusted with the enormous responsibility of amplifying the voices of citizens in the halls of government—and ensuring that governments are making decisions that best serve the interests of their people. Parliamentarians can also play a vital role in empowering citizens to call to task governments that don’t do enough to stop corruption.

For nearly a decade now, the World Bank Group has been at the forefront of diagnosing corruption as part of its mission to fight poverty. Since that time, the World Bank has supported more than 600 anti-corruption programs and governance initiatives in partner countries. For example, the Bank has conducted indepth country governance and corruption surveys and diagnostics; developed multi-pronged anti-corruption strategies; and assisted both governmental and nongovernmental institutions in building their capacity.

Initially, the World Bank’s anti-corruption efforts emphasized strengthening “horizontal” accountability at the government level through building up the judiciary, audit institutions, ombuds offices and anti-corruption agencies. In recent years, these efforts have been complemented by an emphasis on “vertical” accountability to citizens through institutions like the media and civil society.

The parliament is an important institution which cuts across both vertical and horizontal accountability. In most countries, parliament has the constitutional mandate to both oversee government and to hold government to account. At the same time, parliaments can play a key role in promoting horizontal accountability— amplifying the voices of citizens—through such mechanisms as constituency outreach, public hearings, and parliamentary commissions.

This book addresses the role of parliament in curbing corruption. It examines some of the papers presented at three conferences organized jointly by the World Bank Institute and the Commonwealth Parliamentary Association over the past four years, supplemented by specially commissioned chapters. It covers such topics as parliament and anti-corruption legislation, effective financial scrutiny, parliament and supreme audit institutions, the role of the media in curbing corruption, and building parliamentary networks, among others.

-xi-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Role of Parliament in Curbing Corruption
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 264

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.