Documents for the Study of the Gospels

By David R. Cartlidge; David L. Dungan | Go to book overview

Jesus after the Resurrection

Introduction: This Gospel is actually a collection of works, running to some 384 pages in the Coptic edition. The title comes only from a small section of one of the works and was added at a date later than the book’s composition. The various parts of the collection should be assigned different dates: the third century A.D. appears to be a period encompassing the whole collection.

The manuscript of the Pistis Sophia is long; therefore, we can only present here a few excerpts. The form of the work is a series of discourses and speeches in which Jesus, after his resurrection, reveals sacred and saving knowledge to his disciples. There is a great variety of material, such as the recitation of myth, liturgies, prayers, exegeses of the Old Testament, and more. Therefore, this sampling is not representative of the whole.

Pistis Sophia presents a Jesus whose acts and teachings take place after the resurrection, not before. Jesus before the resurrection is of no interest to the document.


Pistis Sophia, Books 1.1; 2.1–8; 4.142–143

Book One

1. It so happened, however, that after Jesus had risen from the dead, he remained there eleven years, speaking with his disciples, and he taught them only up to the places (topoi) of the first laws and up to the places of the first mystery, that within the veil, which is inside the first law, which is the twentyfourth mystery outside, and below those which are found in the second space of the first mystery, which is before all mysteries—the Father in the form of a dove.

And Jesus said to his disciples, “I have come here from that first mystery, which is the last mystery, the twenty-fourth.” The disciples did not know and understand that mystery, that there was something inside that mystery. Rather they thought that that mystery was the Head of the All and the head of all being. And they thought it was the perfection of all perfections, because Jesus had said to them regarding that mystery, that it surrounds the first law and the five impressions and the great light, and the five defenders, and the whole treasure of light.

There is more that the disciples do not understand. The disciples are sitting on
the Mount of Olives, rejoicing in the knowledge that Jesus has given them in

-49-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Documents for the Study of the Gospels
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 299

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.