Documents for the Study of the Gospels

By David R. Cartlidge; David L. Dungan | Go to book overview

A Letter from Pilate to Claudius
and The Trial of Pilate in Rome

Introduction: The letter appears in several places in the late literature of the early Church and in medieval texts. We have used the text in The Acts of Peter and Paul 40–42. Although the letter is late, as early as Tertullian (late second-century) there is mention of a dispatch from Pilate to Tiberius (Tertullian, Apol. 5:21) which is of such character that Tertullian regards Pilate as a converted Christian. The letter of which Tertullian spoke may be akin to the following letter.

The subsequent account of the arrest, trial, and death of Pilate is from The Paradosis (handing over) of Pilate. Both the letter and The Paradosis are considered by some to be earlier than the Acts of Pilate which may have its roots in such literature.

We have included this comparatively late literature to illustrate the tendency to whitewash Pilate and the Romans and to lay more and more blame for the death of Jesus upon the Jews.


A Letter from Pilate to Claudius

40. Pontius Pilate to Claudius, greeting.1

Something recently occurred which I myself uncovered. For the Jews through envy have taken vengeance upon themselves and their posterity with a fearful judgment.

Their fathers of course had received a promise that God would send them his Holy One from Heaven, one who correctly would be called their king; this Holy One, God had promised to send to earth through a virgin. He came to Judea when I was governor.

41. They (the Jews) saw him give sight to the blind, cleanse lepers, heal paralytics, exorcise demons, raise the dead, command the winds, walk upon a rough sea, and do many other miracles. And all the Jewish folk said him to be the very Son of God.

Therefore, the High Priests, moved by envy, seized him and delivered him to me. Piling lie upon lie, they said he was a sorcerer and that he had broken their law.

42. I believed this, ordered him whipped, and handed him over to their will. And they crucified him. When he was buried, they placed a guard over

1. The letter of course should have been addressed to Tiberius.

-82-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Documents for the Study of the Gospels
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 299

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.