Documents for the Study of the Gospels

By David R. Cartlidge; David L. Dungan | Go to book overview

Eleazar

Introduction: This little treatise claims to be a philosophical discussion of “pious reason” (1:1). The following selection is one of the author’s examples of the way that this “pious reason” has triumphed in Israel’s history. It is clear from the story that “pious reason” also means faith, and loyalty to the Jewish way of life. We include it to illustrate the Jewish belief that a righteous man’s death could serve as a vicarious sacrifice to atone for the sins of the less faithful. The setting is during the Maccabean revolt, 166–162 B.C. Antiochus Epiphanes IV, the Seleucid tyrant of Palestine, is portrayed as the villain who is trying to force the Jews to renounce their faith.


4 Maccabees 5:1—6:28

5.1. The tyrant Antiochus, with his court, sat upon a certain high place, and, with his fully armed troops around him, 2. he commanded his personal guards to drag in each one of the Jews, and he ordered the Jews to eat pig’s meat and foods offered to idols. 3. If any should refuse to eat the abominable meats, they were to be tortured and killed. 4. After many had been forcibly seized, one of the first of the group, an old man named Eleazar who was a priest and trained in the Law’s knowledge, who was also well known to many in Antiochus’ court because of the high esteem in which he was held by his own people, was brought before Antiochus.

5–38. Antiochus asks Eleazar to save his own life by eating the pig’s meat
because the meat is a gift of Nature, and one should not reject Nature’s gifts.
Besides, God will forgive such a sin done under duress. Eleazar refuses to eat
the profane flesh and challenges Antiochus to do his worst.

6.1.… The guards dragged Eleazar roughly to the torturing place. 2. First, they stripped the old man, so that he was dressed only in the honorable clothes of piety. 3. Then, binding both his arms, they whipped him. 4. “Obey the king’s commands!” cried a herald standing by. 5. But the confident and noble man, truly an Eleazar,1 was no more shaken than if he were being tortured in a dream. 6. The old man kept his eyes raised up to Heaven, as his flesh was tom by the lashes until he was dripping blood and his sides were gashed. 7. When he fell to the ground because his body could not stand the pain, he still kept his reason unbowed and upright. 8. One of the cruel guards kicked

1. In Hebrew, the name means “God is my helper.”

-180-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Documents for the Study of the Gospels
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 299

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.