Unpopular Privacy: What Must We Hide?

By Anita L. Allen | Go to book overview

NOTES

Preface

1. I introduced my conception of “coerced privacy” in a symposium essay that launched this book project: “Coercing Privacy,” William and Mary Law Review 40: 723–57 (1999).

2. Gerald Gaus and Shane D. Courtland, “Liberalism,” in Edward N. Zalta (ed.), Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy (September 10, 2007). Available at http://plato.stanford.edu/ archives/win2003/entries/liberalism/.

3. See Andrew T. Kenyon and Megan Richardson (eds.), New Dimensions in Privacy Law (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2006).

4. I am referring to the “Directive 95/46/EC on the protection of individuals with regard to the processing of personal data and on the free movement of such data.”

5. For example, “Dredging-Up the Past: Lifelogging, Memory and Surveillance,” University of Chicago Law Review 75: 47–74 (2008); “Undressing Difference: The Hijab and the West,” Berkeley Journal of Gender, Law and Justice 23: 208–24 (2008); “Disrobed: The Constitution of Modesty,” Villanova Law Review 51: 841–57 (2006); “Race, Face, and Rawls,” Fordham Law Review 72: 1677–1695 (2004); “Minor Distractions: Children, Privacy and E-Commerce,” Houston Law Review 38: 751–76 (2001); and “Privacy-as-Data-Control: Conceptual, Practical, and Moral Limits of the Paradigm,” Connecticut Law Review 32: 861–875 (2000).

6. Carl S. Kaplan, “Kafkaesque? Big Brother? Finding the Right Literary Metaphor for Net Privacy,” The New York Times. February, 2, 2001 (describing an essay by Daniel J. Solove); Oscar Gandy, The Panopticon Sort: A Political Economy of Personal Information (Boulder: Colo.: Westview Press, 1993); Charlotte Twight, “Watching You: Systematic Federal Surveillance of Ordinary Americans,” The Independent Review 4 (2): Fall 1999, pp. 165–200.

7. Uniting and Strengthening America by Providing Appropriate Tools Required to Intercept and Obstruct Terrorism (USA PATRIOT) Act, Pub. L. No. 107–56, tit. II, § 209(1) (A), 115 Stat. 272, 283 (2001).

8. See Frederick S. Lane, American Privacy: The 400 Year History of Our Most Contested Right, pp. 31–32 (Boston: Beacon Press, 2009).

9. Alan F. Westin, respected author of the seminal Privacy and Freedom (New York: Atheneum Press, 1967), has conducted privacy polls in conjunction with Harris Polls. The Harris surveys suggest that most people are “privacy pragmatists” (willing to trade privacy for other goods), as opposed to “privacy fundamentalists” (never willing to give up privacy) or “privacy unconcerned” (caring little or nothing about privacy). See http://www.harrisinteractive .com/harris_poll/index.asp?PID=365.

Numerous opinion polls were conducted in 2007 and 2008 concerning health privacy, Internet privacy, freedom from government surveillance, financial privacy, and free expression. The polls included the Health Confidence Survey (May 2008); the Pew Internet &

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Unpopular Privacy: What Must We Hide?
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface ix
  • Part One - Normative Foundations 1
  • 1- Privacies Not Wanted 3
  • Part Two - Physical Privacies- Seclusion and Concealment 27
  • 2- Seclusion 29
  • 3- Modesty 47
  • 4- Nudity 78
  • Part Three - Information Privacies- Confidentiality and Data Protection 97
  • 5- Confidentiality 99
  • 6- Racial Privacy 123
  • 7- The Electronic Data Give-Away 156
  • 8- Popular Paternalism 173
  • Afterword 195
  • Notes 199
  • Index 249
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