The Pact: Bill Clinton, Newt Gingrich, and the Rivalry That Defined a Generation

By Steven M. Gillon | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

I COULD NOT HAVE WRITTEN this book without the support of the University of Oklahoma, the insight of many colleagues and scholars, and the encouragement of friends. I am indebted to David Boren, president of the University of Oklahoma; Provost Nancy Mergler; and Dean Robert Con Davis-Undiano for giving me the freedom to work on this project. Special thanks to Carolyn Morgan, Robert Griswold, and Mindy Jones for all of their help and support over the years. Research assistants George Milne, Paul McKenzie-Jones, and Chris Davis provided a steady stream of material. Nick Davatzes, Gary Ginsberg, and Julian Zelizer read the entire manuscript and offered many helpful suggestions. James T. Patterson, who is one of America’s most eminent historians and also a good friend and mentor, read an early version of the manuscript. He scribbled detailed notes on nearly every page. His comments, always penetrating and always constructive, sent me back to the library for another six months, but they also made this a much better book. At Oxford University Press, Susan Ferber guided the project from beginning to end, making numerous helpful suggestions along the way.

Of course, it would have been impossible to write this book without the cooperation of the two people profiled: President Bill Clinton and Speaker Newt Gingrich. I had the opportunity to interview the president at the very beginning of this project. Although he never formally responded to written follow-up questions, the president did give many of the people around him permission to speak with me. I am especially indebted to Speaker Gingrich, who not only made himself available for interviews, but also opened up his private papers and encouraged all of his close associates and aides to cooperate. For the critical years 1996–98, I depended heavily on the recollections

-ix-

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The Pact: Bill Clinton, Newt Gingrich, and the Rivalry That Defined a Generation
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Preface xi
  • Chapter One- Growing Up 3
  • Chapter Two- It’s the ‘60s, Stupid" 9
  • Chapter Three- Paths to Power 29
  • Chapter Four- Newt Gingrich- Wedges and Magnets 49
  • Chapter Five- Bill Clinton- The "New Democrat" 71
  • Chapter Six- The Critical Year- 1992 91
  • Chapter Seven- First-Term Blues 109
  • Chapter Eight- The Revolution 123
  • Chapter Nine- Fighting Back 135
  • Chapter Ten- Budget Battles 147
  • Chapter Eleven- Winning Re-Election 173
  • Chapter Twelve- "We Can Trust Him" 187
  • Chapter Thirteen- "You Ain’t Seen Nothing Yet" 205
  • Chapter Fourteen- "Monica Changed Everything" 223
  • Chapter Fifteen- "Because We Can" 239
  • Chapter Sixteen- The End of Reform 259
  • Chapter Seventeen- ’60s Legacies 273
  • Sources 285
  • Notes 287
  • Index 321
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