Everywhere and Nowhere: Contemporary Feminism in the United States

By Jo Reger | Go to book overview

Introduction

The Everywhere and Nowhere of U.S. Feminism in the Twenty - first Century

WHO ARE WE?

The Forum for Women is a matrimony of outspoken, ballsy girls. We’re pissed.
We’re driven. We’re going to get things done. Raise your hand if you dare. We may
just enlighten you. We are the third wave of feminists who aren’t afraid to stand up,
step forward and get on top of that damn soapbox. We understand what it means to
be ourselves. We have what it takes to raise our voices and tell it like it is. We know
what we want, and by any means, we’ll get it. We’re tired of making sixty-four cents
to their dollar. Our attitudes and opinions are anything but timid. Boys, don’t
worry, we’re not man-eating barbarians. We like men. They’re okay. However,
some of us like women more. A lot more. Our message is haunting. Tongue-in-cheek.
Risqué. Loud. Witty. Feminine. We’re a kaleidoscope of cultures and backgrounds.
Some of us fancy skirts while others opt for jeans and sweatshirts. But we all have one
thing in common. We love being women. And quite frankly, we love our vaginas.
Unabashedly outspoken, we are the luminous, uncompromising women of this gen-
eration. We will not allow for those women who came before us to be forgotten.
We’re inspired by our foremothers; for all of their contributions and achievements.
Together, we will make a difference. We have what it takes. We are more than just
the Forum for Women. We are a family.

That’s who we are.

—Student group, Forum for Women
Woodview University, 2005

At a university in the Midwest, Jaclyn, the twenty-year-old vice president of Forum for Women (FFW), pens these words as the mission statement for her group. To Jaclyn and the other group members, becoming a feminist is a powerful

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