Obama at the Crossroads: Politics, Markets, and the Battle for America's Future

By Lawrence R. Jacobs; Desmond King | Go to book overview

Contributors

Daniel Carpenter is Freed Professor of American Government and Director of the Center for American Political Studies at Harvard University. His publications include The Forging of Bureaucratic Autonomy: Reputations, Networks and Policy Innovation in Executive Agencies 1862–1928 (2001) which won APSA’s Kammerer Prize and IPSA’s Charles Levine Prize, and Reputation and Power: Organizational Image and Pharmaceutical Regulation at the FDA (2010), which recently received a rare four-star rating from the British Medical Journal.

E. J. Dionne Jr. is an influential columnist on the Washington Post, having previously worked for the New York Times, and a commentator on American politics. He was a Rhodes Scholar at Balliol College, Oxford. He is University Professor at Georgetown University and a senior fellow at Brookings Institution. His publications include Why Americans Hate Politics (1991) and They Only Look Dead: Why Progressives Will Dominate the Next Political Era (1996). His numerous awards include the APSA’s Carey McWilliams Award in 1996.

Lawrence R. Jacobs is the Walter F. and Joan Mondale Chair for Political Studies and Director of the Center for the Study of Politics and Governance in the Hubert H. Humphrey School and Department of Political Science at the University of Minnesota. Dr. Jacobs co-edits the Chicago Series in American Politics for the University of Chicago Press. His recent publications include Health Care Reform and American Politics (with Theda Skocpol, 2010); Class War? What Americans Really Think about Economic Inequality (with Ben Page, 2009); Talking Together: Public Deliberation in America and the Search for Community (with Fay Lomax Cook and Michael Delli Carpini, 2009), and The Unsustainable American State (co-edited with Desmond King, 2009).

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