Taking Our Country Back: The Crafting of Networked Politics from Howard Dean to Barack Obama

By Daniel Kreiss | Go to book overview

6
Mobilizing for Victory

At the close of 2007, the New Media Division’s staffers found themselves almost entirely alone in Chicago. The campaign’s strategists knew that Obama needed a victory in Iowa on January 3 to have any hope of winning the nomination and that the result in New Hampshire five days later would shape the dynamic of the primaries. While the campaign had field operations running in Nevada and South Carolina, they paled in comparison to the resources directed toward these first two contests. Indeed, so much was riding on Iowa that Dan Siroker, the director of analytics, remembers that when he joined the campaign as a volunteer in December “almost everyone in the campaign was actually in Iowa.”1

With the approaching nominating contests, the Obama campaign entered a new phase. While staffers spent much of 2007 preparing for the voting to actually begin, the time had come to test the volunteer mobilization and voter turnout operations in the early primary states for which the campaign had meticulously planned. This new electoral phase meant changes for the New Media Division. The division not only needed to keep its online messaging and small-donor fund-raising growing, its ability to deliver volunteers and voter identifications took on a new importance and urgency. This was especially important in states outside the first four. In what turned out to be an extraordinarily long and hard-fought primary campaign, an outcome few had predicted, mobilization became central to the work of Obama’s new media staffers.

This chapter is about the New Media Division’s mobilization work and the tools, practices, and organization that supported it. Although its staffers were far removed from ground-level battles over electoral turf, the division played an important role in them as a result of staffers’ success at leveraging their new media tools for the ends of the field efforts. New media staffers provided supporters with tools for organizing on-the-ground months in advance of the arrival of active field staffers, created a distributed online canvass operation that involved thousands of volunteers, and registered thousands of new voters online. The chapter opens by looking at attempts to integrate new media and field operations on the campaign during 2007, paying close attention to the role of external sites such as Facebook and internal sites such as MyBO during the primaries. It then

-155-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Taking Our Country Back: The Crafting of Networked Politics from Howard Dean to Barack Obama
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 230

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.