Petrostate: Putin, Power, and the New Russia

By Marshall I. Goldman | Go to book overview

Glossary of People and Companies

People

Jack Abramoff A lobbyist in Washington who worked with Texas Congressman Tom DeLay and ended up in prison. One of their clients was a Russian energy company.

Roman Abramovich A former partner of Boris Berezovsky, Abramovich ended up as the main owner of Sibneft, which he sold to the state, making him the richest man in Russia. He used some of the funds to buy the Chelsea soccer team in London.

Vagit Alekperov A former minister of the petroleum industry in the Soviet Union who set aside valuable oil properties for himself and created LUKoil. He is the largest individual stockholder. LUKoil sold 20 percent of its stock to ConocoPhillips.

Svetlana Bakhmina A junior lawyer working for Yukos, she was arrested in the early morning hours and held hostage in an effort to force her boss to return to Russia for questioning after he fled to London.

Stanislav Belkovsky An analyst who works closely with Kremlin officials and who often has leaked information which signaled measures that were about to be taken by the Kremlin.

Boris Berezovsky One of the original oligarchs who became very close to members of Yeltsin’s family. Among other assets he controlled were Sibneft and Aeroflot as well as ORT, the main state-owned TV network. Early on, he befriended Putin and helped him rise to power. However after being criticized on ORT, Putin turned on him, and Berezovsky fled to London where he lives in exile.

Leonard Blavatnik A Russian émigré with an MBA from the Harvard Business School. He is the principle owner of Access Industries, a U.S. company, which is a major stockholder in Tyumen Oil and SUAL, Russia’s second largest aluminum company. Sergei Bogdanchikov The CEO of Rosneft, the state-dominated oil company that took over ownership of the most valuable properties from Yukos.

Vladimir Bogdanov A veteran oil official who became CEO of Surgutneftegaz when it became privatized.

-225-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Petrostate: Putin, Power, and the New Russia
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 244

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.