Shared Responsibility, Shared Risk: Government, Markets and Social Policy in the Twenty-First Century

By Jacob S. Hacker; Ann O’Leary | Go to book overview

3
The American Challenge in
Cross-national Perspective

NEIL GILBERT

The economic crisis that arose in 2008 poses a formidable challenge to social welfare policymakers throughout the world. In examining the nature of this challenge and its policy implications for modern welfare states, it is useful to begin with a review of several trends that place the immediate economic predicament in a broader social context. Since the 1980s, modern welfare states have experienced a number of important policy-related developments that involve public and private expenditures, labor force participation, welfare demand, and employment measures. These developments reflect the shifting degrees of responsibility for managing economic risk among governments, individuals, and employers. This chapter analyzes these shifts from a comparative cross-national perspective, with a particular focus on how U.S. experiences compare to those of other advanced industrial democracies and the various implications for risk and insecurity therein. In conducting a wide-angle survey of the social landscape, the picture that emerges provides more of an impressionist’s rendition of the world than a sharply focused photograph—which is to say that the trends I summarize may be a bit fuzzy around the edges, but nevertheless convey a reasonable approximation of the empirical experiences they seek to trace.1


Social Expenditure and Taxation

In order to understand the current U.S. experience from a cross-national perspective, it is important to first examine the relationship between social expenditure and taxation, which differs greatly across nations. This section will detail the history of social expenditures in the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) member countries and will explore how the recent economic crisis has affected nations’ abilities to spend on social welfare programs.

-39-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Shared Responsibility, Shared Risk: Government, Markets and Social Policy in the Twenty-First Century
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 276

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.