Chapter One
Cradle of Civilizations

Siberia is part of Asia and has been the home for millennia of a variety of peoples and cultures. The lives of early Siberians were shaped by the landscape and became diverse because of it. The southern steppe produced a semi-nomadic, pastoral way of life. The forests lent themselves to the lifestyle of the hunter, some of whom migrated with reindeer between the tundra of the north and the taiga farther south. On the coasts and around the rivers Siberians fished and hunted in a landscape of abundance. We rarely think of this remarkable region as a cradle of civilizations, but Siberia is known to be the origin of the native North Americans, whose ancestors probably migrated across a land bridge to present-day Alaska before moving south through the Americas. At the same time, Siberia is Russia’s sixteenth-century “North Asian colony”. It was distant enough from Russia and sufficiently foreign to qualify as a part of the New World. But Siberia is also contiguous to Russia, which simply extended its borders outwards to embrace this new land and draw it into the Old World. Some might say that this paradox of Siberia—of being a New World within the Old—is at the heart of understanding not only its past and present, but also its future.

The origins of the name Siberia are Tartar and probably came from thirteenth-century Mongol usage. The Russians began calling the area “Siberian Land”, then simply Siberia. For our purposes, the story of Siberia begins in the Pleistocene era, a period that started some 600,000 years ago and lasted until about 10,000 years ago, during which large regions of

-1-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Siberia: A Cultural History
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 297

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.