Social Movements and the Transformation of American Health Care

By Jane C. Banaszak-Holl; Sandra R. Levitsky et al. | Go to book overview

11
Shadow Mobilization for Environmental
Health and Justice

Scott Frickel

For over a quarter century, citizen demands for “environmental justice” and more recently “environmental health justice,” have energized place-based political struggle in rural and urban settings across the United States (Gibbs 2002). Although widely varied, these conflicts typically involve citizen groups or a coalition of community groups and “grassroots support organizations” (Tesh 2000) organized against industrial polluters and the various governmental organizations charged with the regulation, disposal, and management of environmental hazards (Cable and Cable 1995; Szaz 1994).

While the rights-based discourse adopted by the environmental justice movement (EJM) locates its political demands squarely within U.S. civil rights law (Cole and Foster 2001), community-level outcomes often turn on the technical merits of activists’ claims regarding the existence of environmental contamination and the various impacts those hazards have on individuals and communities. The question of impacts, and particularly health impacts, depends further on the generation of credible evidence regarding chemical fate, transport, and bioavailabilty, as well as the length, frequency, and routes of exposure. In such contexts, toxicologists, epidemiologists, geneticists, physicians, and other health experts can influence community outcomes by reconfiguring the production and circulation of strategic forms of scientific knowledge (Allen 2003; Brown 2007; Fischer 2000). To maximize that potential, it is necessary to gain a better understanding of whether and how those “expert activists” are organized. Existing research has focused almost exclusively on the roles that individual professionals play in various local settings, but has yet to engage broader sets of questions concerning the structure of expert activism and the dynamics of expert mobilization and recruitment.

-171-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Social Movements and the Transformation of American Health Care
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 383

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.