The Jury and Democracy: How Jury Deliberation Promotes Civic Engagement and Political Participation

By John Gastil; E. Pierre Deess et al. | Go to book overview

Chapter 9
Political Society and Deliberative Democracy

Lest our statistics drown out the voices of the individual jurors in our study, we begin this concluding chapter with the reflections of a King County juror. This particular person had served a previous time on a jury and had returned to the courthouse for another round:

This is the second time in my life I’ve been called for jury duty, and
I think now, as I did then, that our system is about the best anyone
could have. I feel that most jurors take their responsibilities seriously
and do their best to be fair and listen to all the evidence before making
any judgments. In talking to the people around me, I was impressed
with their attitudes about being called for duty. How fortunate we are
to live in America!

The data presented in this book show that many fellow jurors have had equally inspiring experiences. In the broadest sense, then, Justice Kennedy was correct when he asserted, citing Tocqueville in Powers v. Ohio, that juries have a civic educational power. To pull together the findings shown in chapters 3–7, Table 9.1 summarizes the main results of our research on how jury service changes people’s civic and political attitudes and behaviors. Referring back to the map of the state, political society, and civil society, the table shows that the jury has as wide a range of impacts as we initially expected. Those effects measure as small changes, with the only exception being that service at the courthouse has a relatively large positive impact on jurors’ confidence in the quality of the jury system itself. From voting to community conversation, from group membership to public affairs media use, the different aspects of jury service had wide-ranging and intriguing connections to changes in jurors’ post-service behavior. Important civic and

-173-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Jury and Democracy: How Jury Deliberation Promotes Civic Engagement and Political Participation
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Acknowledgments vii
  • Contents xi
  • Figures xiii
  • Tables xv
  • Photos xix
  • Chapter 1 - Freedom in Our Hands 3
  • Chapter 2 - Between State and Society 12
  • Chapter 3 - From Jury Box to Ballot Box 26
  • Chapter 4 - Answering the Summons 52
  • Chapter 5 - Citizen Judges 73
  • Chapter 6 - From Courthouse to Community 106
  • Chapter 7 - Civic Attitude Adjustment 129
  • Chapter 8 - Securing the Jury 154
  • Chapter 9 - Political Society and Deliberative Democracy 173
  • Further Reading 193
  • Methodological Appendix 195
  • Notes 215
  • References 241
  • About the Authors 259
  • Index 261
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 267

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.