The Jury and Democracy: How Jury Deliberation Promotes Civic Engagement and Political Participation

By John Gastil; E. Pierre Deess et al. | Go to book overview

Further Reading

Though The Jury and Democracy presents an original argument, it builds on previous scholarship in law, civic engagement, political participation, and public deliberation. Two recent works that have celebrated the jury as a vital institution in American democracy include Jeffrey Abramson’s We, the Jury: The Jury System and the Ideal of Democracy (Harvard, 2000) and William Dwyer’s In the Hands of the People: The Trial Jury’s Origins, Triumphs, Troubles, and Future in American Democracy (St. Martin’s, 2002). Though we mainly suggest books here, we would be remiss not to recommend two pertinent law articles: Vikram D. Amar’s 1995 essay, “Jury Service as Political Participation Akin to Voting,” (Cornell Law Review, Vol. 80, pp. 203–59), and Barbara Underwood’s 1992 piece, “Ending Race Discrimination in Jury Selection: Whose Right Is It, Anyway?” (Columbia Law Review, Vol. 92, pp. 725–74).

The only work to consider at length the lasting impact of jury service on the jurors themselves is Paula Consolini’s 1992 U.C.-Berkeley doctoral dissertation, Learning by Doing Justice: Private Jury Service and Political Attitudes. Funded by the National Science Foundation, this landmark study helped to close the gaps between jury research, political participation research, and studies of the relationship between legal institutions and political attitudes, and it is available online at our project website, www. jurydemocracy.org.

Books that have looked more closely at the mechanics and pitfalls of the jury system include Neil Vidmar and Valerie Hans’ American Juries: The Verdict (Prometheus, 2007), Randolph Jonakait’s The American Jury System (Yale, 2003), Valerie Hans and Neil Vidmar’s Judging the Jury (Perseus, 1986), and Neil Vidmar’s edited World Jury Systems (Oxford, 2000). Other

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The Jury and Democracy: How Jury Deliberation Promotes Civic Engagement and Political Participation
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Acknowledgments vii
  • Contents xi
  • Figures xiii
  • Tables xv
  • Photos xix
  • Chapter 1 - Freedom in Our Hands 3
  • Chapter 2 - Between State and Society 12
  • Chapter 3 - From Jury Box to Ballot Box 26
  • Chapter 4 - Answering the Summons 52
  • Chapter 5 - Citizen Judges 73
  • Chapter 6 - From Courthouse to Community 106
  • Chapter 7 - Civic Attitude Adjustment 129
  • Chapter 8 - Securing the Jury 154
  • Chapter 9 - Political Society and Deliberative Democracy 173
  • Further Reading 193
  • Methodological Appendix 195
  • Notes 215
  • References 241
  • About the Authors 259
  • Index 261
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