The Pretenses of Loyalty: Locke, Liberal Theory, and American Political Theology

By John Perry | Go to book overview

7
Locke and Loyalty in
Contemporary Political
Theology
Three Ways of Making the Turn

It is an arresting fact that neither reason nor faith has come close
to conquering the human spirit. There was a time (in the age of
Augustine, for example) when faith was expected by many to spread
inexorably; there was also a time (the Enlightenment) when the
gradual and inevitable triumph of reason was anticipated. Both
expectations have been disappointed.

—Glenn Tinder, The Political Meaning of Christianity

While in his twenties, the young Locke read and then later retold a fascinating story from China:

We have recently heard reports of a city, situated in the East,
among the Chinese, which after a prolonged siege was
driven at last to surrender. The gates were thrown open to
the enemy forces and all the inhabitants gave themselves up
to the will of the triumphant victor. They had abandoned to
their enemy’s hands their own persons, their wives, families,
liberty, wealth, and in short all things sacred and profane,
but when they were ordered to cut off the plait of hair which,
by national custom, they wore on their heads, they took up
their arms again and fought fiercely until, to a man, all were
killed.1

This is one of the earliest hints in Locke’s work that he was starting to take seriously these sorts of commitments: commitments that can lead people, seemingly against all reason, to choose death over a haircut. This story is the sort of Antigone that Locke would have written: one with a clear villain and without all the inconvenient

-165-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Pretenses of Loyalty: Locke, Liberal Theory, and American Political Theology
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 264

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.