Prove It on Me: New Negroes, Sex, and Popular Culture in the 1920s

By Erin D. Chapman | Go to book overview

INDEX
Abbott, Robert, Chicago Defender, 125, 166n23
Activism, New Negroes, 9
Advertisements
campaigns for consumer dollars, 83-84
Clara Smith, 94-95
culture industries, 165n7
Ethel Waters, 91, 92f
Golden Brown, 102f
“Hateful Blues” advertisement, 96, 98f
Jimmy Blythe, 92-93
Katheryne Boyd, 99-101, 109
“Mean Papa Turn in Your Key,” 95-96, 97f
products, 84-85, 87-91
Trixie Smith, 92-93
Walker Manufacturing Co. products, 84-85,87-91
“Whip it to a Jelly” advertisement, 94-95
Within Our Gates, 24, 25f, 26f, 159n43
African Blood Brotherhood, 155n19
Albrier, Frances Mary
domestic work, 123
migration, 122
racial advancement, 127-128
racial solidarity, 118
“Americanism,” white supremacist, 5
Anita Bush Stock Company, Lafayette Players, 156-157n7
Anti-Lynching Crusaders, NACW, 51
Anti-lynching ideology
Ida B. Wells, 48-50, 59
NAACP, 50-52, 160n57
NACW, 45, 47,49-50
Within Our Gates, 25
Art
New Negroes, 9, 161n5
racial advancement, 10
Associated Negro Press, 28, 29
Atlanta School of Social Work, 54,58,162n13
Baker, Josephine
photograph, 106f
self-possession, 105-107
Barker, Elizabeth Cardozo, New Negro women, 133
Beauty competition
Caspar Holstein and Bennie Butler, 110-112,167n37
photograph, 110f
Birth control, New Negroes, 13, 66,69-70
The Birth of a Nation
African American character, 27-28, 30
Griffith’s film, 4, 27, 28
stereotypical characters, 158n37
Birthright, Micheaux film, 20
Black family
disorganization, 67
E. Franklin Frazier’s analysis of, 52, 54, 63-67
working women, 69-70
Black feminism, ideology, 12
Black men
employment opportunities, 70
employment prospects and wages, 75-76
World War I, 158n36
Black-owned businesses, sex discrimination, 71
Black politics, New Negro era, 154-155n19
Black schools, 74, 125, 127
Black Swan Records, Waters, 80
Black women
economic independence, 85-86
empathy of fellow black people, 120-122
recreating themselves, 90-91
working mothers, 66, 164n61

-183-

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