The Perils of Federalism: Race, Poverty, and the Politics of Crime Control

By Lisa L. Miller | Go to book overview

Two
A POLITICAL HISTORY OF CRIME
ON THE CONGRESSIONAL AGENDA

“How did you go bankrupt?” Bill asked.
“Two ways,” Mike answered. “Gradually and then suddenly.”

—Ernest Hemingway, The Sun Also Rises

Legal scholars and social scientists writing about crime policy at the national level have focused primarily on the sudden growth in federal criminal jurisdiction over the past 40 years.1 While this growth is indisputable, the emphasis on recent years misstates the slow development of crime as a national policy issue over the course of the nation’s history. A more accurate picture reflects something of Mike’s answer to the question of his financial ruin in The Sun Also Rises. How has federal jurisdiction over ordinary crimes grown so large? Gradually over the course of the nation’s first 150 years, and then suddenly in the wake of social upheavals, increasing crime rates, racial prejudice, and dramatic changes to the structure of American politics. This perspective on crime in national politics is consistent with recent research on the dramatic increases in incarceration rates in the 1970s and 1980s and also with more general American politics scholarship illustrating that attention to social problems can evolve both gradually and suddenly.2 Each process has important implications for how issues are framed, the groups that participate in the policy process, and the institutions that emerge as a result of agenda attention.

There are several limitations to short-term analyses of national crime policy. First and foremost, they miss an opportunity to see how paths of access to policy making become smoothed in favor of specific actors and

-28-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Perils of Federalism: Race, Poverty, and the Politics of Crime Control
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 254

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.