The Perils of Federalism: Race, Poverty, and the Politics of Crime Control

By Lisa L. Miller | Go to book overview

WORKS CITED

Abney, Glenn, and Thomas P. Lauth. 1985. Interest Group Influence in City Policy-Making: The Views of Administrators. Western Political Quarterly 38: 148–161.

Amenta, Edwin. 1998. Bold Relief: Institutional Politics and the Role Origins of Modern American Social Policy. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press.

Anderson, Elijah. 1999. Code of the Streets: Decency, Violence and the Moral Life of the Inner City. New York: Norton.

Anner, John. 1996. “Linking Community Safety with Police Accountability.” In John Anner, 1986, Beyond Identity Politics: Emerging Social Justice Movements in Communities of Color. Boston: South End Press.

Aberbach, Joel, and Jack Walker. 1970. Political Trust and Racial Ideology. American Political Science Review 64: 1212.

Baker, John S. 1999. State Police Powers and the Federalization of Local Crime. Temple Law Review 72: 675–713.

Barker, Vanessa. 2006. The Politics of Punishing: Building a State Governance Theory of American Imprisonment Variation. Punishment and Society 8 (1): 5–32.

Barkow, Rachel E. 2005. Federalism and the Politics of Sentencing. Columbia Law Review 105 (4): 1276–1314.

Bastian, Lisa D., and Bruce M. Taylor. 1994. Young Black Male Victims: National Crime Victimization Survey. Office of Justice Programs, U.S. Department of Justice. NCJ 147004. Washington, DC: Bureau of Justice Statistics.

Bauer, Lynn, and Steven D. Owens. 2004. Justice Expenditures and Employment in the United States, 2001. Office of Justice Programs, Department of Justice. NCJ 202792. Washington, DC: Bureau of Justice Statistics.

Baumgartner, Frank R., and Bryan D. Jones, eds. 2002. Policy Dynamics. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

Baumgartner, Frank R., and Bryan D. Jones. 2000. The Evolution of Legislative Jurisdictions. Journal of Politics 62: 321–349.

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