Why America Fights: Patriotism and War Propaganda from the Philippines to Iraq

By Susan A. Brewer | Go to book overview

4
War in Korea

“The Front Line in the Struggle between
Freedom and Tyranny”

The future of civilization depends on what we do.

President Harry Truman, 1950

Someone gave old Harry the wrong dope on this war. He can find someone
else to pin his medals on.

GI in Korea, 1950

THE KOREAN WAR WAS A LIMITED WAR with far-reaching consequences. The U.S. government viewed North Korea’s invasion of South Korea in 1950 as part of a communist plot to achieve global domination. Acting on the belief that the Soviet Union ordered the attack, President Harry Truman sent U.S. forces to Korea to contain the spread of communism. Korea, he declared, had become “the front line in the struggle between freedom and tyranny.” Despite Truman’s clear public pronouncement of Korea’s significance, the president and his advisors feared that Korea wasn’t the real front line. They worried that the war there might be a distraction intended to draw the United States away from the real target in Europe or the Middle East. Therefore, wary of possible Soviet aggression elsewhere, it designated Korea a limited war. Meanwhile the U.S. government tripled the military budget; committed to supporting anticommunist forces in the Philippines, Vietnam, and Taiwan; and rearmed its recent enemies, West Germany and Japan. The United States geared up to fight a global Cold War.

To win the support of the American people for this ambitious policy, the Truman administration set out to, in the words of Secretary of State Dean Acheson, “bring the whole story together in one official narrative.”1 Following

-141-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Why America Fights: Patriotism and War Propaganda from the Philippines to Iraq
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 342

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.