Sex and the Soul: Juggling Sexuality, Spirituality, Romance, and Religion on America's College Campuses

By Donna Freitas | Go to book overview

Notes

Introduction

1. All of the names and certain identifying features of the students referenced in this book have been changed to protect the identities of the participants. Their comments and stories are told as accurately as possible, with some commentary edited for purposes of readability.

2. Amy’s description of her style of dress comes from her journal entry. Almost all of the students interviewed (107 out of 111) for this study completed a written questionnaire—a “journal”—from which some of Amy’s testimony is taken.

3. It was common across all students in the study for them to say that they have more of a chance of landing a relationship when they are seniors because that is when people are ready to “settle down.”

4. This news may be a surprise to some given the recent spate of books that rail against religion and belief. See, for example, Sam Harris, The End of Faith (New York: Norton, 2004) and Letter to a Christian Nation (New York: Knopf, 2006); Richard Dawkins, The God Delusion (Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 2006); and Christopher Hitchens, God Is Not Great: How Religion Poisons Everything (New York: Twelve, 2007). See Stephen Prothero, Religious Literacy (San Francisco, CA: HarperSanFrancisco, 2007), as a counterargument to these atheist manifestos. The popularity of these books in the United States attests to religion’s enduring power.

5. Alan Finder, “Matters of Faith Find a New Prominence on Campus,” New York Times (May 2, 2007), http://select.nytimes.com/search/restricted/article?res= F10810FF3B5A0C718CDDAC0894DF404482, accessed 5/19/2007. For additional thorough assessments of teens, young adults, and faith, see, for example,

-253-

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